​​     Casey's Cottage is open for self-guided tours on Saturday and Sunday from 2 - 4 pm from Memorial Day to Labor Day. 


Casey Cottage is being restored and maintained by the Friends of Mexico Point Park, Inc., a non-profit organization, dependent upon donations, membership dues and fund raisers.  

 To become a member of the Friends of Mexico Point Park you may contact contact Betty at 963-7657 or Sandy at 963-3891, or click here for application and information.


Casey's Cottage is available for smaller events such as business, club or organization meetings, rehearsal dinners, intimate weddings, showers, family gatherings, etc.  Click here for an Application for Usage.  

 

Hauntings?

      After the death of Dr. Casey in 1978, the cottage remained empty and uncared for for many years.  During the time the cottage sat abandoned, young people found a way to get in to “party”.  Some have returned since it has been restored
and relate to us events that occurred during their time in the cottage.  Some felt as if they were being watched, some
heard faint organ music, others felt a chill breeze pass over them. 

     Stories of sightings of ethereal images under the tree where a young woman was buried, and cries for help echoing from the lake have been related.  While working at the cottage some volunteers have experienced similar things as well as fleeting glimpses of forms moving through the rooms, furniture having been moved, keys being lost then found in strange places, a candle jumping off a mantle shelf, and the feeling of not being alone.

    Professional paranormal investigators have documented orbs, voices, chills, and physical touches.  

 


Casey’s Cottage, nestled among the trees near the former mouth of the Little Salmon River at Mexico Point, is truly a “gem.”  Across the lush lawns to the west of the cottage is the stone foundation with magnificent ship chains along the entryway.  It is all that remains of Orville Hungerford’s elegant Mexico Point Club House (1906).  Guests were met at the train station in Mexico and brought to the Clubhouse by a horse-drawn carriage.  The horses were returned to the carriage

house.  With the advent of the automobile, horses were no longer necessary so that building was no longer needed.  What remained of the carriage house was transformed into a medieval manor house, known as Casey’s Cottage, by two close friends: Dr. William C. Casey and Severin Bischof.  Bill Casey provided the means and Severin Bischof provided the designs.

The cottage was a work of love, a place of beauty, friends, companionship and good conversation only.”                          John Bischof, Artist’s son

Casey's Cottage

at

Mexico Point State Park